Sitting in the Mediterranean Sea with Italy to the North and Northern Africa to the South is the country of Malta. Made up of three islands: Malta, Comino and Gozo, the whole country covers just 122 square miles.

It’s the perfect destination for history lovers, outdoor adventurers and those looking to catch the last rays of summer sun in Europe.

During the autumn months the sun sets quite early and it’s worth to get up in the morning to make use of the daylight. Outdoor activities and sightseeing should be high on the daytime agenda whilst dining and relaxing are for the evening.

The islands offer an array of small beaches, caves and lagoons and the main tourist attractions should not be the only ones on the agenda. Diving and snorkelling are available all year round to see the colorful sights that lie beneath.

malta bays and walks

Hiking is an up and coming activity on the islands. There are numerous walking routes, however, never expect to be too far away from other people, for small islands they are busy with locals and tourists. The Dingli cliffs are the highest point, reaching 820 ft above sea level.

With various rulers over the years, the British were the last before Malta became independent in 1964. The British influence is still very apparent across the island, including the use of traditional red telephone and post boxes. The Maltese have their own language with English still used officially.

malta telephone and post boxes

Laying so close to Italy, the gastronomy of the island boasts the influence of the Italians. Locally made pizzas, pastas and ice creams can be found alongside their own cuisine. Ftira, rabbit and beef bragioli are traditional Maltese dishes and when visiting in the fall, the Lampuki (Dolphin fish) is in season and should certainly be tried.

Their own wine is produced on both Malta and Gozo islands, with full bodied notes of dark fruits and oak.

Those in search of history should visit the ancient capital of Mdina and discover the streets of Valletta, including the world war two shelters that lead underground.

Malta has also remained very affordable for food, accommodation and local transport.

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Jennifer Hardy
Jennifer is a writer for various websites mainly on the topics of travel, leisure, and whiskey mainly around Europe. She is originally from England, now living in Spain. When she isn't writing or reading, she can be found swimming or snorkeling during the summer and hiking in the mountains, equipped with a rucksack and tent during the winter months. You can visit her blogs at www.whiskyadventurers.com, www.tripstipstravelstastes.com, and www.jennifersdesk.com.